Langkawi and the Batu Caves

My next few days on Langkawi continued the pattern of lounging around and relaxing. I read some more books and headed to Underwater World an aquarium which started off not very good and got better. At RM22 (£4.50) for students the price was OK too. I also headed to a Reggae bar on the beach and a club where surprisingly as I am massively out of practice I was complemented on my dancing! The music was solid too. Not dance but more poppy music which I prefer. I don’t go clubbing that often – I can count the number of times on my trip on one hand but if you are with friends it is great fun (though as I want to have a real attachment to a woman it’s not my ideal place to pull women.).

After Langkawi I returned to KL which was fine though the bus trip was a bit dodgily organized so I had to buy the bus ticket twice. Only RM50 (£10) lost but still it’s not good.

After arriving into KL late I went to my absolute favourite restaurant (McDonalds) for dinner before going to bed. The next day after breakfast I headed by bus (which took seemingly forever) out to the Batu Caves. These are an awesome set of caves on the outside of Kuala Lumpur. The caves are a Hindu temple and have a giant gold statue of a Hindu god outside. The caves themselves are also impressive and absolutely massive and stretch up to the top of the hill breaking through into the jungle as well as giving a great view of KL. Unfortunately they are also very dirty and smelly and need more proactive clearance of rubbish. I also headed into the dark caves for an “educational” tour which was interesting and cost RM35 (£7). This contained lots of bats and other animals which live off the bat excrement including cockroaches that was interesting to see. We also got to learn about the beautiful rock formations in the caves and a temperature controlled “wind tunnel”.

After this I headed back to KL and went back to the Petronas towers to do a brief bit of book shopping and bought this weeks Economist (which has a very interesting article on the spread of English – EDIT: link) before heading to have dinner and watch Slumdog Millionaire. First though I had the most expensive meal I’ve eaten in Malaysia which was delicious Korean food. It cost RM17 so I would spend more than RM15 to get a free cinema ticket to see Slumdog millionaire. I did OK as the cinema would have cost RM8 otherwise. On the film itself I don’t know if it’s a true story but it’s an excellent and believable tale on modern India and love that is well worth seeing if you have the chance. The premise is a guy from the Indian slums beats lawyers and rich people to win 10 million rupees (about US$200,000) and the police don’t believe him as he’s uneducated. Of course coming from the slums exposes him to the “real world” more than the lawyers so not everything is against him.

Pictures named

I named the rest of my photos this morning.

Sorry I don’t have time now to post about what I’ve been up to here in KL as I need to go and get my bags and head over to the airport for my flight to China this evening. It has been pretty good however.

Relaxing, trains and Chinese New Year

After the museum the next day I just chilled out in Kuala Lumpur and read the excellent book Absolute Power. This is about an American president who has rough sex with a woman which goes too far and she lands up dead. The problem is that there is a witness; a three times convicted burgler so from there the plot unfolds.

Apart from that I chilled out in my dorm. On the 25th I then took the train to Singapore which actually ended up taking 7.5 hours to complete the journey. This is due to the extreme speed of the Malaysia/Singapore border controls which took absolutely ages to complete. The issue is that Singapore and Malaysia have a lovers tiff over a few different issues including Singapores water usage and the railway line which is owned by Malaysia. I can see why the Singaporeans are upset about the railway. It is hardly used but the space taken up would allow six tracks to be constructed all the way through Singapore. To put this into perspective the Japanese run a Shinkansen up to 9 times an hour between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka with only two tracks (aside from stations which have four tracks – two fast, two slow) and some of those trains are much faster than others.

After arriving into Singapore I caught the bus from the unmarked railway station bus stop (evidence of the lovers tiff from the other side) to the MRT to get to my hostel. After arriving in Singapore I headed down to get some food first of all – as it’s Chinese New Year I expected to have some Chinese food. Unfortunately all the Chinese restaurants were shut leaving me with a choice of McDonalds, Burger King, KFC or fish and chips. After careful deliberation over my difficult choice I went for the fish and chips – however it was only average as it was in breadcrumbs rather than only being cooked in batter.

After this I headed down to the bay to watch some free live Chinese jazz by the waterfront (the venue is actually called Esplanade outdoor theatre) before returning to my hostel at 9pm to see who was there. I liked the atmosphere on the waterfront it was chilled out and relaxed and not tense at all so it was very non-Anglo Saxon in a good way. They do this every Friday, Saturday and Sunday and it isn’t a Chinese new year think so if you’re in town go and check it out.

At this point I returned to my hostel were I met some English guys and we had a few beers before going to Chinatown via the longest wait ever at the MRT ticket machines – if you go to Singapore at festival time get an EZ link card – do not pass go do not collect £200 (which at the current exchange rate is US$200 :p – seriously it’s only US$270 when at the start of my trip it was US$400.) the people I was with didn’t and we had to queue for 30 minutes. After this we hung around Chinatown waiting for midnight. At which point there were some cool but loud firecrackers followed by frankly mediocre fireworks. My local school has put on better for bonfire night in the UK.

More time in KL

After seeing the Islamic side of KL the next day I headed to the Petronas towers and the KL aquarium.

First I met up with some people from my hostel for a morning drink at my favourite restaurant – McDonalds. After this I walked over to the Petronas towers to pick up my free ticket to go onto the skybridge as they limit the numbers allowed before I returned to have a look around the aquarium. Once I arrived at the aquarium which frankly was only OK especially for the money. The problem was that there weren’t that many minor tanks and they were all either too small or had too many fish in them for my liking. There were a lot of fish swimming round in circles or barely able to move at all in their enclosure. Overall the only good tank was the main ocean tank which was massive and contained sharks and other sealife. This tank was actually excellent and contained a huge tunnel through the bottom which gave you a great view of the fish there. For me the perfect aquarium would contain the main tank here with the smaller tanks of the Osaka aquarium.

After seeing this I headed back to the petronas towers for my skybridge visit. Firstly we watched a glossy 3d film before going up the south tower and crossing the skybridge half way up. What’s incredible about that is that you are still taller than practically every other building in the city which really shows how much taller the Petunas towers are than the other buildings in KL. The view from the top is fine but KL isn’t a particularly great city to look down on. To be honest I prefer the view of the buildings themselves from the outside.

After that I went and had a look around the colonial district of KL which contains beautiful European-style buildings but is tiny essentially consisting of a single square. After that I was hungry as malaysian dishes are often very small so I went to Burger King before returning to my hostel for the night.

The next day I headed out after breakfast to the national museum which was supposed to be rubbish but actually wasn’t bad – especially for the enterance fee of 2RM (40p). The first gallery was excellent and on the prehistory of Malaysia. Things got worse as the museum progressed mostly down to them being in the middle of a refurbishment. They even talked about independence and while they criticize the British for lack of education and not fully integrating the country they do give them implicit respect too for giving them independence and building things like the railways.

After this I went outside where they had an exhibition on ASEAN this was interesting as it showed the cultures of the countries and was intended to show how integrated they are but frankly it failed – most notably their economic status which aside from Viet Nam were in native currencies rather than the standard US dollar (or Euro) so a comparison can be done between the countries. Also from the list of bodies each country chose to include that they were a member of it was clear each country had made their exhibition piece separately – they’ve clearly got a long way to go before they’re anything like the EU.

After this I again returned to the hostel as I was tired given how hot it is in KL.

Islam in KL

On my first full day in KL I went to the Islamic Arts museum. I did this by public transport which involved first taking the monorail from Times Squsre shopping centre to KL Sentral station which went past a lot of interesting architecture.

From KL station I then took a damp (probably from the air conditioning) commuter train north to the old Kuala Lumpur station. This was apparently reminisant inside of an old London railway station but if so it was like Fenchurch street or something – not Paddington. The outside of the station was suitably impressive however as was the KL rail headquarters across the road which were built in a cross between British and Islamic style. I’m starting to understand Islamic style more now I’m in Malaysia and it seems to be very mathematical and geometric. This is because you aren’t able to display pictures of people in mosques you have a lot of beautiful patterns instead.

After seeing this I went to the Malaysian national mosque which was fairly attractive though not particularly impressive. There they were supporting a boycott of American companies as their government supports Israel. This was of course highly ironic as the posters were probably made on computers manufactured by an American company using American chips (possibly even chips made and designed in Israel as Intel has a multi-billion dollar microchip factory there – source: Arstechnica.) running American software and researched using an American search engine and hosted by an American webhost.

Prehaps a boycott of Intel (use AMD instead) would be in order to show that people feel Israel acts appallingly (which frankly they do – though the Palestinean terrorists also behave badly towards Israel.) and that would also severely affect the Israeli economy.

After this I went to the Islamic arts museum just up the road. This had a couple of special exhibitions on including one on Islams role in Britain. This was very interesting photographic exhibition funded in part by the British High Commission (the equivalent of an embassy in a commonwealth country.) here in Malaysia. The exhibition included pictures of a lot of British Muslims including a white, female Judge (this was occompanied by the punnish title never judge a book by it’s cover – probably only funny if you have been away from puns for a while.). I think the pun is a piece of humour that only the British do and it is part of our culture. This exhibition was a very interesting look at my culture at least partially from the outside – the exhibition would do well to be shown in the UK as well.

Although Britain took Islam into account as far ago as 1911 when Halal meat was allowed most of the progress has occurred within the last 10-15 years. I do think that the London central mosque should be demolished and rebuilt as it is a concrete monstrosity and is undoubtably one of the ugliest mosques in the world. From further looking at the museum this seems to be typical as Chinese and South East Asian mosques seem to take a traditional local style – though the mosques I’ve seen in Malaysia seem to be styled as you’d expect.

After seeing the exhibition on Islam in Britain I went to a local street stall for lunch as the museum restaurant was too expensive for me (45RM – £9) and after this I returned to the museum. The next exhibition I saw was on Islamic architecture which was interesting and even included the mathematic significance of it including the golden ratio which is apparently also the ratio between the sides and radius of a pentagon as well as linking the terms in the Fibonacci sequence. These relate to many things in nature as well as music and buildings like the Taj Mahal also has a lot of mathematics in it’s construction.

After this I saw the main exhibtion galleries which included some Islamic history as well as beautiful ceramics, metalwork and cloth. The ceramics especially looked very European as 19th century European pottery took a lot from Islamic pottery. These were also very interesting to see – it is clear there is a lot more to Islamic art than Persian rugs! There was also some more stuff on several of the Islamic empires including the Mughals in India – there apparently wealth and power had to be displayed.

After that I had a wander around before getting a new cover for my Nokia 6230i to replace the old and busted cover. After that I went to a food court for dinner which was excellent; except for the main course which was average. Then it started absolutely pouring down with rain so I went indoors to McDonalds for some chips.