Bay of Islands

I had a fairly lazy stay in the bay of islands actually and I didn’t do that much except wince at the food prices as every meal seemed to cost £9 which makes it more expensive than New York – of course now the exchange rate is approximately $1=£1 that is no longer the case but it was certainly true when I was there before the exchange rates went insane.

On the middle day I headed out into the bay on a sail catamaran which was great fun – the boat got really wet so it had to be dodged as we sailed pretty damn fast as the wind was strong. I also did some sea kayaking which was great fun around an island where we stopped for lunch and I also did some shoeless walking as the boat captain refused to bring my shoes over in his dingy and I didn’t want to get them wet in my kayak.

Then on the Thursday I caught the bus down towards Rotaruha – as usual the bus didn’t show a Hollywood movie – not even the Zohan and it also regularly stopped for rest stops rather than providing food and toilets on board. This is a total downgrade from South American buses.

Heading North

From Auckland I headed north of Auckland on the bus. Unlike the buses in south America they didn’t have Hollywood’s greatest on offer for entertainment and they also stopped the bus at a service station on route.

So instead of the low-brow film I get to talk about the book I read instead. I’m currently reading a book on Mathematical Finance (generally my absolute favourite topic) and randomness which is very interesting and it is called Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholad Taleb. It has a lot of relevence to the current financial crisis which is more interesting as the edition I am reading was published in 2004.

He made his money betting on random events occurring as even though he then took small losses in the steady markets he makes big in volitile markets. He also has an interesting view on Hedge Funds which are usually dispised that they are actually a good thing and show that the stock market isn’t rational. Basically he is saying that many investors (who I believe are primarily banks and pension funds so aren’t just investing the money of the rich) act stupidly and people are promoted because of knowledge of the current market that don’t take into account of bad events that aren’t occurring at that moment. Of course those things do happen and in the process banks lose hundreds of millions of dollars in a very short space of time. Maybe we need to put our money with banks who will invest it sensibly (and often conservatively, though he also says that risks are fine if you understand them.). To an extent I’d guess there is positive correlation with good customer service, though I’m sure it isn’t 100%.

Once I got off the bus my cousin picked me up and we went and did a few chores before having a nice dinner at home and heading out to a band launch and some other bars/clubs in Whangerai. The next day we headed out down the winding roads of the region to the excellent Kauri forest museum (the Kauri trees are massive New Zealand trees that last for thousands of years and are a bit like a redwood.) which talked about both logging and the Kauri gum trade which were at there peak at the start of the 20th century. The museum also had lots of information on logging and how the wood was exported, mostly to Australia, but also to Europe, Hong Kong and the Americas. The museum also showed some wood buried in coal for 20 million years that still had a wood-like appearance. If Kauri furniture could last even a fraction of that time it’d be seriously special. So after seeing that we had a late lunch before heading back to my cousins house. In the evening we watched Matrix Revolutions which was as shit and overblown as the last time I’d seen it. It also dragged on for hours meaning we didn’t get to bed until 1am.

Then on Sunday we headed out down more winding (and in cases non-tarmaced but decent roads) to take a look at both the biggest and second biggest Kauri trees which were massive. Something else I liked was that unlike the redwood they aren’t the only trees in the forest meaning you can get to see a good look at the scale of them. After that we headed to a forest lookout so you could see the unbroken canopy of forest of the region which although lots of logging has taken place the remaining forest isn’t broken into tiny pieces as it is in Argentina.

You may have also noticed that I haven’t talked about the culture in New Zealand compared to the other places I’ve visited. This is because the culture here is pretty similar to the UK. It is a bit more relaxed and trusting though.